October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which is an annual campaign to increase awareness of the disease.

While most people are aware of breast cancer, many forget to take the steps to have a plan to detect the disease in its early stages and encourage others to do the same. We have made a lot of progress but still have a long way to go and need your help!

Want to Help? Learn more Here!

May is National Osteoporosis Month

 

“Did you know that two million broken bones occur every year in the U.S. due to osteoporosis? It’s true, but most people get their fracture fixed without ever realizing they have osteoporosis or low bone mass.

Join us in celebrating National Osteoporosis Month this May by taking action to Break Free from Osteoporosis. Our Break Free from Osteoporosis campaign encourages everyone to get to know their risk factors for osteoporosis and make the lifestyle changes needed to build strong bones for life.

Please download and share the information and materials below to join us in spreading the word about the importance of building and maintaining strong bones.”   Article cited from National Osteoporosis Foundation, Learn more here!

URINE TESTING: THE SIMPLE WAY TO KEEP YOU AND YOUR KIDNEYS HEALTHY

Your urine is probably not something you think about often. But it’s actually the easiest and most effective way to catch the start of kidney damage. Like with other diseases, early detection is the key to reducing your risk of progressing to permanent kidney disease or kidney failure. This opportunity for prevention is even more important because early kidney disease has no signs or symptoms. Symptoms show up only after permanent damage has already occurred.

Urine testing is quick, easy, and non-invasive. It is low cost and is generally covered by insurance. It is used to detect protein in the urine, which is not normal. Your kidneys have tiny filters which usually do not allow protein to pass through them. If protein is present in the urine this may indicate that they are damaged. Your healthcare provider will follow up if you do have protein in your urine. There may be other causes so kidney damage will need to be confirmed with further testing.

The good news is that even if you have protein in your urine, there are many things you can do to stop it. Changes in diet and lifestyle habits, along with the right medications and treatment plan, can either stop or slow the progression of kidney disease! This is especially important for people who are already at risk to develop kidney disease, namely people with diabetes and/or high blood pressure, family history of kidney disease, and people over 60 years old.

So remember…

  • Early kidney disease has no signs or symptoms. The only way to know if you have kidney disease is to first have your urine tested for albumin.
  • Kidney disease does not go away. It may get worse over time and can lead to kidney failure. If your kidneys fail, you may need to go on dialysis or have a kidney transplant.
  • Kidney disease can be treated. The sooner you know you have kidney disease, the sooner you can get treatment to help delay or prevent kidney failure. Treating kidney disease may also help prevent heart disease.
  • Discuss urine testing with your healthcare provider, or find one of NKF’s Keep Healthy events, where you can receive free urine testing and much more!

Go Red for Women in February

Women are strong. Women are smart. Women solve problems. Women can do anything men can do. And, there are some things we’re even better at – dying of heart disease and stroke. Like breaking barriers? Go Red! And help break the one against heart disease.

It’s not just a man’s disease. Each year, 1 in 3 women die of heart disease and stroke. But we can change that because 80 percent of cardiac events can be prevented with education and lifestyle changes.

When it comes to beating heart disease and stroke, change can be the cure. To save lives and raise awareness of this serious issue, the American Heart Association launched Go Red For Women. And the red dress has become the iconic symbol of our battle against heart disease and stroke in women.

National Wear Red Day® — the first Friday each February — is our special day to bring attention to this staggering fact. We encourage everyone to wear red, raise their voices, know their cardiovascular risk and take action to live longer, healthier lives.

A Decade of Success

Since the first National Wear Red Day in 2003, we’ve made tremendous strides in the fight against heart disease and stroke in women. Through research and education to healthy lifestyle changes, we’re proud that:

  • Nearly 90% have made at least one healthy behavior change.
  • More than one-third has lost weight.
  • More than 50% have increased their exercise.
  • 6 out of 10 have changed their diets.
  • More than 40% have checked their cholesterol levels.
  • One third has talked with their doctors about developing heart health plans.
  • Today, nearly 300 fewer women die from heart disease and stroke each day
  • Death in women has decreased by more than 30 percent over the past 10 years.

 

More Work is Crucial

Yet, with all these successes, 1 in 3 women die of heart disease and stroke each year,. But what’s more powerful? Millions of mothers, sisters, daughters and friends making a change.

More than ever, your financial contributions help save women’s lives. Funds raised by Go Red support educational programs to increase women’s awareness about their risk for heart disease and stroke as well as critical research to discover scientific knowledge about cardiovascular health.

We deeply appreciate all of your support. We wouldn’t be where we are without you. But we have more to accomplish.

Get involved. Go Red by telling other women that 1 in 3 women die of heart disease and stroke, yet it is 80% preventable. Make a change.

Article cited from https://www.goredforwomen.org/

The 6 Golden Rules Of A Healthy Grocery Cart

*By Kristin Kirkpatrick for U.S. News | article cited from Huffington Post

I like to think of myself as a fairly non-judgmental kind of girl. The problem is, when I’m waiting in the grocery store checkout line, that persona goes out the store’s sliding doors. As I wait for my turn, I find myself examining the contents of others’ carts, and sometimes — dare I say — I judge.

If I see a basket of cookies and cola, for example, I have to resist the urge to turn around and ask, “Why?” The same is true when I see a family wheeling a full cart — without a single vegetable or fruit. Most frustrating, though, is when I see what appears to be a well-intentioned attempt at healthiness that falls short, like a mom who buys a super sugary breakfast bar for her child, believing the claim it contains “real” fruit.

I wish I didn’t have these thoughts; I wish I didn’t even look. But I’ll chalk it up to my job and knowing that the food we choose to put in our bodies has a direct impact on our weight and disease status. Fortunately, the thoughts that go through my head stay there and never come out to a fellow shopper. I thought it was time to put these thoughts on paper.

I can’t blame my fellow shoppers: The grocery store is one of the most deceptive places out there, filled with confusing and oftentimes misleading front-of-package claims that trick people into thinking their food choices are healthy when in fact, they’re not. The store is also filled with tempting foods and lots of them. You might have 30 varieties of ice cream or 40 types of frozen dinners. It’s not the fault of the grocery store, either — it simply carries the items, and many stores today are pushing healthier options. That’s why it’s truly up to all of us to make the right choices. Here’s your simple guide to the best cart possible:  Click Here to Read More…